How can we trust Greg Clarke and the Football Association on anything?

The treatment of Eni Aluko and the child abuse victims has been marked by repeated boardroom buffoonery. When Clive Sheldon QC completes his investigation into the abuse scandal, will the FA hold bits back to protect its reputation?

In ordinary circumstances it might have been a pleasant surprise that someone in a high position has finally found the voice to float the possibility that Gordon Taylor, the chief executive of the Professional Footballers’ Association, has spent so long building his ivory tower he has allowed his organisation to be guilty, for far too long, of operating with blurred priorities.

There are plenty of us who have wondered the same, bearing in mind the man at the top, already reputedly earning more than any other union boss on the planet, plainly felt he could do a whole lot better for himself a few years back. Taylor’s earnings went up from £1.3m to £3.4m – more, to put it another way, than Joachim Löw was paid for winning the World Cup – and if you want an example of how lopsided it all is, just consider Kick It Out’s financial struggles around that time, operating from a fourth-floor office above a pizza restaurant in Clerkenwell and trying to get by on funding of less than £300,000 a year. The PFA’s contribution, around £95,000, was the equivalent of what Taylor raked in for himself every 10 days or so.

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The treatment of Eni Aluko and the child abuse victims has been marked by repeated boardroom buffoonery. When Clive Sheldon QC completes his investigation into the abuse scandal, will the FA hold bits back to protect its reputation?In ordinary circumstances it might have been a pleasant surprise that someone in a high position has finally found the voice to float the possibility that Gordon Taylor, the chief executive of the Professional Footballers’ Association, has spent so long building his ivory tower he has allowed his organisation to be guilty, for far too long, of operating with blurred priorities.There are plenty of us who have wondered the same, bearing in mind the man at the top, already reputedly earning more than any other union boss on the planet, plainly felt he could do a whole lot better for himself a few years back. Taylor’s earnings went up from £1.3m to £3.4m – more, to put it another way, than Joachim Löw was paid for winning the World Cup – and if you want an example of how lopsided it all is, just consider Kick It Out’s financial struggles around that time, operating from a fourth-floor office above a pizza restaurant in Clerkenwell and trying to get by on funding of less than £300,000 a year. The PFA’s contribution, around £95,000, was the equivalent of what Taylor raked in for himself every 10 days or so. Continue reading…

https://www.theguardian.com/football/2017/oct/21/greg-clark-football-association-trust

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